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Q-Plex™ Human Adiponectin

  • Regulatory status:RUO
  • Type:Singleplex Assays
  • Other names:Adipocyte C1q and collagen domain-containing protein, Adipocyte complement-related 30 kDa protein, ACRP30, Adipose most abundant gene transcript 1 protein, apM-1, Gelatin-binding protein, ADIPOQ, ACDC, APM1, GBP28
  • Species:Human
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Cat. No. Size Price


462149HU 96 wells (1 kit)
PubMed Product Details
Technical Data

Cat # changed from RQS462149HU to 462149HU

Type

Singleplex Assays

Applications

Serum, Plasma, Cell culture supernatant

Sample Requirements

50 µl/well

Storage/Expiration

Store the complete kit at 2–8°C. Under these conditions, the kit is stable until the expiration date.

Calibration Range

28.3 – 0.12 ng/mL

Limit of Detection

0.1 ng/mL

Summary

Features

  • For research use only
  • Detection Method: Chemiluminescent
  • This kit is validated for use with plasma, serum, and cell culture supernates

Research topic

Chronic renal failure, Coronary artery disease, Diabetology - Other Relevant Products, Energy metabolism and body weight regulation

Summary

The Q-Plex™ Human Adiponectin Kit is a fully quantitative ELISA. The assay measurement is achieved by placing two spots consisting of capture antibodies in a defined array to the bottom of each well of a 96-well plate. Along
with the assay spots, there is one positive control spot for assuring proper assay procedure and for software overlay placement. High quality reagents help ensure the accuracy and precision of your results.

Using less than 50 μL of sample per well, up to 80 samples can be assayed for a single assay within 2.5 hours. The
array design of the singleplex kit, allows the user to have intra-well replicates for additional statistical data. The Q-Plex™ Human Adiponectin ELISA provides researchers an easy to use and cost effective means of generating data for each sample.

Summary References (17)

References to Adiponectin

  • Lam KS, Xu A. Adiponectin: protection of the endothelium. Curr Diab Rep. 2005, 5, 254–259.
  • Ding X, Saxena NK, Lin S, Xu A, Srinivasan S, Anania FA. The roles of leptin and adiponectin: a novel paradigm in adipocytokine regulation of liver fibrosis and stellate cell biology. Am J Pathol. 2005, 166, 1655–1669.
  • Xu A, Chan KW, Hoo RL, Wang Y, Tan KC, Zhang J, Chen B, Lam MC, Tse C, Cooper GJ, Lam KS. Testosterone selectively reduces the high molecular weight form of adiponectin by inhibiting its secretion from adipocytes. J Biol Chem. 2005, 280, 18073–18080.
  • Wang Y, Lam KS, Xu JY, Lu G, Xu LY, Cooper GJ, Xu A. Adiponectin inhibits cell proliferation by interacting with several growth factors in an oligomerization-dependent manner. J Biol Chem. 2005, 280, 18341–18347.
  • Ouchi N, Kobayashi H, Kihara S, Kumada M, Sato K, Inoue T, Funahashi T, Walsh K. Adiponectin stimulates angiogenesis by promoting cross-talk between AMP-activated protein kinase and Akt signaling in endothelial cells. J Biol Chem. 2004, 279, 1304–1309.
  • Ishikawa Y, Akasaka Y, Ishii T, Yoda-Murakami M, Choi-Miura NH, Tomita M, Ito K, Zhang L, Akishima Y, Ishihara M, Muramatsu M, Taniyama M. Changes in the distribution pattern of gelatinbinding protein of 28 kDa (adiponectin) in myocardial remodelling after ischaemic injury. Histopathology. 2003, 42, 43–52.
  • Diez JJ, Iglesias P. The role of the novel adipocyte-derived hormone adiponectin in human disease. Eur J Endocrinol. 2003, 148, 293–300.
  • Waki H, Yamauchi T, Kamon J, Ito Y, Uchida S, Kita S, Hara K, Hada Y, Vasseur F, Froguel P, Kimura S, Nagai R, Kadowaki T. Impaired multimerization of human adiponectin mutants associated with diabetes. Molecular structure and multimer formation of adiponectin. J Biol Chem. 2003, 278, 40352–40363.
  • Yamauchi T, Kamon J, Ito Y, Tsuchida A, Yokomizo T, Kita S, Sugiyama T, Miyagishi M, Hara K, Tsunoda M, Murakami K, Ohteki T, Uchida S, Takekawa S, Waki H, Tsuno NH, Shibata Y, Terauchi Y, Froguel P, Tobe K, Koyasu S, Taira K, Kitamura T, Shimizu T, Nagai R, Kadowaki T. Cloning of adiponectin receptors that mediate antidiabetic metabolic effects. Nature. 2003, 423, 762–769.
  • Yamauchi T, Kamon J, Waki H, Imai Y, Shimozawa N, Hioki K, Uchida S, Ito Y, Takakuwa K, Matsui J, Takata M, Eto K, Terauchi Y, Komeda K, Tsunoda M, Murakami K, Ohnishi Y, Naitoh T, Yamamura K, Ueyama Y, Froguel P, Kimura S, Nagai R, Kadowaki T. Globular adiponectin protected ob/ob mice from diabetes and ApoE-deficient mice from atherosclerosis. J Biol Chem. 2003, 278, 2461–2468.
  • Daimon M, Oizumi T, Saitoh T, Kameda W, Hirata A, Yamaguchi H, Ohnuma H, Igarashi M, Tominaga M, Kato T. Decreased serum levels of adiponectin are a risk factor for the progression to type 2 diabetes in the Japanese Population: the Funagata study. Diabetes Care. 2003 Jul;26(7):2015–20.
  • Pajvani UB, Du X, Combs TP, Berg AH, Rajala MW, Schulthess T, Engel J, Brownlee M, Scherer PE. Structure-function studies of the adipocyte-secreted hormone Acrp30/adiponectin. Implications for metabolic regulation and bioactivity. J Biol Chem. 2003, 278, 9073–9085.
  • Spranger J, Kroke A, Mohlig M, Bergmann MM, Ristow M, Boeing H, Pfeiffer AF. Adiponectin and protection against type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lancet. 2003, 361, 226–228.
  • Kondo H, Shimomura I, Matsukawa Y, Kumada M, Takahashi M, Matsuda M, Ouchi N, Kihara S, Kawamoto T, Sumitsuji S, Funahashi T, Matsuzawa Y. Association of adiponectin mutation with type 2 diabetes: a candidate gene for the insulin resistance syndrome. Diabetes. 2002, 51, 2325–2328.
  • Wang Y, Xu A, Knight C, Xu LY, Cooper GJ. Hydroxylation and glycosylation of the four conserved lysine residues in the collagenous domain of adiponectin. Potential role in the modulation of its insulin-sensitizing activity. J Biol Chem. 2002, 277, 19521–19529.
  • Tsao TS, Lodish HF, Fruebis J. ACRP30, a new hormone controlling fat and glucose metabolism. Eur J Pharmacol. 2002, 440, 213–21.
  • Das K, Lin Y, Widen E, Zhang
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